Audio Books Podcasts

Librivox: Zuleika Dobson by Beerbohm, Max show

Librivox: Zuleika Dobson by Beerbohm, MaxJoin Now to Follow

'A wickedly funny 1911 satire on undergraduate life in Edwardian Oxford' in which the entire student body of Oxford university including the young, handsome aristocrat the Duke of Dorset falls hopelessly in love with Zuleika who is visiting her grandfather, the warden of Judas college, and ultimately commit mass suicide at the end of 'Eights Week' (Summary by Andy Minter)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre oder die Entsagenden by Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von show

Librivox: Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre oder die Entsagenden by Goethe, Johann Wolfgang vonJoin Now to Follow

Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre oder die Entsagenden von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749 - 1832) Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre oder die Entsagenden ist ein Roman von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Er gilt als die persönlichste aller Goetheschen Dichtungen. 1821 erschien die erste Fassung, 1829 die vollständige. Ihr fehlen die vorangestellten Gedichte des Fragments von 1821. (Zusammenfassung von Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Bible (KJV) 29: Joel by King James Version show

Librivox: Bible (KJV) 29: Joel by King James VersionJoin Now to Follow

The Prophet Joel, the Second Minor Prophet of the Old Testament, entire book is read. (Summary by Susan S.)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Daodejing (Tao Te Ching) by Laozi show

Librivox: Daodejing (Tao Te Ching) by LaoziJoin Now to Follow

Nach heutigen Erkenntnissen (linguistisch, Zitierbelege etc.) entstand das Daodejing um 400 v. Chr. Laozi (chin. 老子, Lǎozǐ, W.-G. Lao Tzu „‚Alter Meister‘“), ein legendärer chinesischer Philosoph, soll im 6. Jahrhundert v. Chr. gelebt haben. Je nach Umschrift wird der Name auch Laotse, Lao-Tse oder Lao-tzu geschrieben. Erstveröffentlichung der Übersetzung 1910. Das Daodejing (chin. 道德經, Dàodéjīng) (ältere Umschrift: Tao Te King) ist eine Sammlung von Spruchkapiteln, die dem legendären Weisen Lǎozǐ zugeschrieben wird. Die Entstehungsgeschichte ist ungewiss und Gegenstand sinologischer Forschung. Ungeachtet weiterer Übersetzungen bedeuten Dào „Weg, Prinzip“ und „Sinn“, und Dé „Kraft, Leben“ und „Charisma, Tugend, Güte“. Jīng bezeichnet einen Leitfaden bzw. eine klassische Textsammlung. Die beiden namengebenden Begriffe stehen für etwas Unaussprechliches, auf dessen eigentliche Bedeutung das Buch hindeuten möchte. Aus diesem Grund werden sie auch oft unübersetzt belassen. Das Werk gilt als die Gründungsschrift des Daoismus. Obwohl dieser verschiedene Strömungen umfasst, die sich vom Dàodéjīng erheblich unterscheiden können, wird es von den Anhängern aller daoistischen Schulen als kanonischer, heiliger Text angesehen. (Zusammenfassung von Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Germania by Tacitus, Publius Cornelius show

Librivox: Germania by Tacitus, Publius CorneliusJoin Now to Follow

The Germania (Latin: De Origine et situ Germanorum, literally The Origin and Situation of the Germans[1]), written by Gaius Cornelius Tacitus around 98, is an ethnographic work on the Germanic tribes outside the Roman Empire. Germania fits squarely within the tradition established by authors from Herodotus to Julius Caesar. Tacitus himself had already written a similar essay on the lands and tribes of Britannia in his Agricola. The Germania begins with a description of the lands, laws, and customs of the Germanic people; it then segues into descriptions of individual tribes, beginning with those dwelling closest to Roman lands and ending on the uttermost shores of the Baltic, among the amber-gathering Aesti, the primitive and savage Fenni, and the unknown tribes beyond them. Tacitus' descriptions of the Germanic character are at times favorable in contrast to the opinions of the Romans of his day. He holds the strict monogamy and chastity of Germanic marriage customs worthy of the highest praise, in contrast to what he saw as the vice and immorality rampant in Roman society of his day, and he admires their open hospitality, their simplicity, and their bravery in battle. One should not, however, think that Tacitus' portrayal of Germanic customs is entirely favorable; he notes a tendency in the Germanic people for what he saw as their habitual drunkenness, laziness, and barbarism, among other traits. Tacitus says that physically, the Germans appeared to be a distinct race, not an admixture of their neighbors. In Chapter 4, he mentions that they have common characteristics of blue eyes, blond or reddish hair and large size. In Chapter 7, Tacitus describes their government and leadership as somewhat merit-based and egalitarian, with leadership by example rather than authority and that punishments are carried out by the priests. He mentions that the opinions of women are given respect. In Chapter 9, Tacitus describes a form of folk assembly rather similar to the public Things recorded in later Germanic sources: in these public deliberations, the final decision rests with the men of the tribe as a whole. Tacitus further discusses the role of women in Chapters 7 and 8, mentioning that they often accompany the men to battle and offer encouragement. He says that the men are often motivated to fight for the women because of an extreme fear of their being taken captive. Tacitus says that the Germans are mainly content with one wife, except for a few political marriages, and specifically and explicitly compares this practice favorably to other barbarian cultures, perhaps since monogamy was a shared value between Roman and Germanic cultures. He also records that adultery is very rare, and that an adulterous woman is shunned afterward by the community regardless of her beauty. This translation by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb, was first published in 1877. (Summary from Wikipedia.)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Herodotus' Histories Vol 2 by Herodotus of Halicarnassus show

Librivox: Herodotus' Histories Vol 2 by Herodotus of HalicarnassusJoin Now to Follow

The [i]Histories[/i] of Herodotus of Halicarnassus is considered the first work of history in Western literature. Written about 440 BC, the Histories tell the story of the war between the Persian Empire and the Greek city-states in the 5th century BC. Herodotus traveled extensively around the ancient world, conducting interviews and collecting stories for his book. The rise of the Persian Empire is chronicled, and the causes for the conflict with Greece. Herodotus treats the conflict as an ideological one, frequently contrasting the absolute power of the Persian king with the democratic government of the Greeks. (Summary adapted from Wikipedia.)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Agricola by Tacitus, Publius Cornelius show

Librivox: Agricola by Tacitus, Publius CorneliusJoin Now to Follow

The Agricola (Latin: De vita et moribus Iulii Agricolae, lit. On the life and character of Julius Agricola) is a book by the Roman historian Tacitus, written c 98, which recounts the life of his father-in-law Gnaeus Julius Agricola, an eminent Roman general. It also covers, briefly, the geography and ethnography of ancient Britain. As in the Germania, Tacitus favorably contrasts the liberty of the native Britons to the corruption and tyranny of the Empire; the book also contains eloquent and vicious polemics against the rapacity and greed of Rome. This translation by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb, was first published in 1877. (Summary from Wikipedia.)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Petit Nord, Le by Grenfell, Anne MacLanahan show

Librivox: Petit Nord, Le by Grenfell, Anne MacLanahanJoin Now to Follow

A collection of letters from Anne (MacLanahan) Grenfell, future wife of Sir Wilfred Grenfell, regarding her year of missionary service at the orphanage in St. Anthony, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. (Summary by Sean Michael Hogan)

By LibriVox

Librivox:  show

Librivox: Join Now to Follow

Anna Karenina tells of the doomed love affair between the sensuous and rebellious Anna and the dashing officer, Count Vronsky. Tragedy unfolds as Anna rejects her passionless marriage to follow her heart and must endure the hypocrisies of society. (Summary by Mary Anderson)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Irish Impressions by Chesterton, G. K. show

Librivox: Irish Impressions by Chesterton, G. K.Join Now to Follow

“For the Irish Question has never been discussed in England. Men have discussed Home Rule; but those who advocated it most warmly, and as I think wisely, did not even know what the Irish meant by Home. Men have talked about Unionism; but they have never even dared to propose Union. A Unionist ought to mean a man who is not even conscious of the boundary of the two countries; who can walk across the frontier of fairyland, and not even notice the walking haystack. As a fact, the Unionist always shoots at the haystack; though he never hits it. But the limitation is not limited to Unionists; as I have already said, the English Radicals have been quite as incapable of going to the root of the matter. Half the case for Home Rule was that Ireland could not be trusted to the English Home Rulers. They also, to recur to the parable, have been unable to take the talking cow by the horns; for I need hardly say that the talking cow is an Irish bull. What has been the matter with their Irish politics was simply that they were English politics. They discussed the Irish Question; but they never seriously contemplated the Irish Answer.” (- Gilbert Keith Chesterton)

By LibriVox