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Librivox: Ring o' Roses: A Nursery Rhyme Picture Book by Brooke, L. Leslie show

Librivox: Ring o' Roses: A Nursery Rhyme Picture Book by Brooke, L. LeslieJoin Now to Follow

A collection of Classical children's nursery rhymes. Many familiar, a few unfamiliar, all simple and easy for younger children.

By LibriVox

Librivox: Familiar Letters on Chemistry by Liebig, Justus show

Librivox: Familiar Letters on Chemistry by Liebig, JustusJoin Now to Follow

“The Letters contained in this little Volume embrace some of the most important points of the science of Chemistry, in their application to Natural Philosophy, Physiology, Agriculture, and Commerce. Some of them treat of subjects which have already been, or will hereafter be, more fully discussed in my larger works. They were intended to be mere sketches, and were written for the especial purpose of exciting the attention of governments, and an enlightened public, to the necessity of establishing Schools of Chemistry, and of promoting by every means, the study of a science so intimately connected with the arts, pursuits, and social well-being of modern civilised nations.” –Justus Liebig, August 1843

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Librivox: Letter Concerning Toleration, A by Locke, John show

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Letter Concerning Toleration by John Locke was originally published in 1689. Its initial publication was in Latin, though it was immediately translated into other languages. In this "letter" addressed to an anonymous "Honored Sir" (actually Locke's close friend Philip von Limborch, who published it without Locke's knowledge) Locke argues for a new understanding of the relationship between religion and government. One of the founders of Empiricism, Locke develops a philosophy that is contrary to the one expressed by Thomas Hobbes in Leviathan, primarily because it supports toleration for various Christian denominations. Locke's work appeared amidst a fear that Catholicism might be taking over England, and responds to the problem of religion and government by proposing toleration as the answer. Unlike Hobbes, who saw uniformity of religion as the key to a well-functioning civil society, Locke argues that more religious groups actually prevent civil unrest. Locke argues that civil unrest results from confrontations caused by any magistrate's attempt to prevent different religions from being practiced, rather than tolerating their proliferation. Locke's primary goal is to "distinguish exactly the business of civil government from that of religion." He makes use of extensive argument from analogy to accomplish his goal, and relies on several key points. The thing that he wants to persuade the reader of is that government is instituted to promote external interests, relating to life, liberty, and the general welfare, while the church exists to promote internal interests, i.e., salvation. The two serve separate functions, and so, must be considered to be separate institutions. (Summary from Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: History of England from the Accession of James II - (Volume 2, Chapter 08) by Macaulay, Thomas Babington show

Librivox: History of England from the Accession of James II - (Volume 2, Chapter 08) by Macaulay, Thomas BabingtonJoin Now to Follow

In this chapter of Thomas Babington Macaulay’s History of England we see conflict between James II and his subjects. James is Catholic but rules a Protestant country. There are some serious stand-offs with colleges at Oxford and Cambridge plus conflict with the London clergy.

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Librivox: Iliad for Boys and Girls, The by Church, Alfred J. show

Librivox: Iliad for Boys and Girls, The by Church, Alfred J.Join Now to Follow

Alfred J. Church wrote many books looking at classical literature, but is especially well known for his re-telling of classic books in a style so that younger readers may follow the story. The Iliad for Boys and Girls is a retelling of Homer’s Iliad, centred around the events of the siege of Troy during the final year. (Summary by Lizzie Driver)

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Librivox: Jack and Jill by Alcott, Louisa May show

Librivox: Jack and Jill by Alcott, Louisa MayJoin Now to Follow

Jack and Jill went up a hill To coast with fun and laughter. Jack fell down and broke his crown, And Jill came tumbling after. When Jack and Jill tumble off of their sled on the first good snow of the season, their injuries cause them to be bedridden for many months putting an end to their fun and frolics. Their parents and friends fill their days with the joys of Christmas preparations, a theatrical production and many other imaginative events. Both learn how to become better friend's to each other and their other school mates through their many trials. This is a warm and joyous story.

By LibriVox

Librivox: Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, The by Equiano, Olaudah show

Librivox: Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, The by Equiano, OlaudahJoin Now to Follow

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, written in 1789, is the autobiography of Olaudah Equiano. It discusses his time spent in slavery, serving primarily on galleys, documents his attempts at becoming an independent man through his study of the Bible, and his eventual success in gaining his own freedom and in business thereafter. The book contains an interesting discussion of slavery in West Africa and illustrates how the experience differs from the dehumanising slavery of the Americas. The Intereresting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano is also one of the first widely read slave narratives. It was generally reviewed favorably. (Wikipedia)

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Librivox: Sign of the Four, The by Doyle, Arthur Conan, Sir show

Librivox: Sign of the Four, The by Doyle, Arthur Conan, SirJoin Now to Follow

When a young lady approaches Sherlock Holmes looking for help in finding out what happened to her father when he disappeared 10 years earlier, both Holmes and Watson are sent on a mission involving stolen treasure, service in colonial India and a secret pact among four ex-convicts. (Summary by Robin Cotter)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Consolation of Philosophy, The by Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus show

Librivox: Consolation of Philosophy, The by Boethius, Anicius Manlius SeverinusJoin Now to Follow

Consolation of Philosophy (Latin: Consolatio Philosophiae) is a philosophical work by Boethius written in about the year 524 AD. It has been described as the single most important and influential work in the West in medieval and early Renaissance Christianity, and is also the last great work that can be called Classical. - Consolation of Philosophy was written during Boethius' one year imprisonment while awaiting trial, and eventual horrific execution, for the crime of treason by Ostrogothic King Theodoric the Great. Boethius was at the very heights of power in Rome and was brought down by treachery. It was from this experience he was inspired to write a philosophical book from prison reflecting on how a lord's favor could change so quickly and why friends would turn against him. It has been described as “by far the most interesting example of prison literature the world has ever seen.” - The Consolation of Philosophy stands, by its note of fatalism and its affinities with the Christian doctrine of humility, midway between the heathen philosophy of Seneca the Younger and the later Christian philosophy of consolation represented by Thomas Aquinas. - The book is heavily influenced by Plato and his dialogues (as was Boethius himself). (Summary from Wikipedia)

By LibriVox