Podcast Directory

Librivox: Cocoa and Chocolate by Knapp, Arthur William show

Librivox: Cocoa and Chocolate by Knapp, Arthur WilliamJoin Now to Follow

As that heavenly bit of chocolate melts in our mouths, we give little thought as to where it came from, the arduous work that went in to its creation, and the complex process of its maturation from a bean to the delicacy we all enjoy. This "little book" details everything you have ever wanted to know (and some things you never knew you wanted to know) about cocoa and chocolate from how the trees are planted and sustained to which countries produce the most cacao beans. Do cacao beans from various countries differ? What makes some types of chocolate higher quality than other kinds? Are there any health benefits to eating chocolate? Read on to learn the answers to these and many other questions about that wondrous little treat we call chocolate. (Summary by Allyson Hester)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Miller's Daughter, The by Tennyson, Alfred, Lord show

Librivox: Miller's Daughter, The by Tennyson, Alfred, LordJoin Now to Follow

LibriVox volunteers bring you 19 different recordings of The Miller's Daughter by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. This was the weekly poetry project for the week of July 13th, 2008.

By LibriVox

Librivox: Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson, The -  Version 2 by Twain, Mark show

Librivox: Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson, The - Version 2 by Twain, MarkJoin Now to Follow

It was published in 1893–1894 by Century Magazine in seven installments, and is a detective story with some racial themes. The plot of this novel is a detective story, in which a series of identities — the judge's murderer, Tom, Chambers — must be sorted out. This structure highlights the problem of identity and one's ability to determine one's own identity. Broader issues of identity are the central ideas of this novel. Twain's multiple plots and thrown-together style do serve to inform a central set of issues, with the twins, Pudd'nhead, and Tom and Chambers all serving as variations on a theme. The themes are slavery, tradition, and nature vs. nurture. To a lesser extent, Southern society and first impressions are also touched upon, and the novel is one of the first to use fingerprints as a means of unique identification, as it was not until 1897 that the world's first Fingerprint Bureau opened in Calcutta. One of Twain's major goals in this book was to exploit the true nature of Racism at that period. Twain used comic relief as a way to divulge his theme. The purpose of a comic relief is to address his or her opinion in a less serious way, yet persuade the reader into thinking the writers thoughts. Twain's use of satire is visible throughtout the book. Twain's use of colloquialism(dialect) and local color as features of Naturalism to convey his theme, is impressive and ahead for his time.(Summary by Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Short Poetry Collection 067 by Various show

Librivox: Short Poetry Collection 067 by VariousJoin Now to Follow

LibriVox's Short Poetry Collection 067: a collection of 20 public-domain poems.

By LibriVox

Librivox: History of the United States, Vol. V by Beard, Charles Austin show

Librivox: History of the United States, Vol. V by Beard, Charles AustinJoin Now to Follow

Charles Beard was the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. He graduated from DePauw University in 1898, where he met and eventually married Mary Ritter Beard, one of the founders of the first greek-letter society for women, Kappa Alpha Theta. Many of his books were written in collaboration with his wife, whose own interests lay in feminism and the labor union movement. In 1921, Charles and Mary Beard published their textbook: History of the United States. A contemporaneous review stated: [i]The authors… assume enough maturity in…students to justify a topical rather than a chronological treatment. They have dealt with movements, have sketched large backgrounds, have traced causes, and have discussed the interrelation of social and economic forces and politics. All this has been directed to the large purpose of helping the student to understand American today in all its national characteristics and as part of world civilization as well...The literary style is exceptionally clear and crisp, and the whole approach…is thought producing. As a textbook or handbook for the average citizen it ranks with very best.

By LibriVox

Librivox: Dark House ,The by Fenn, George Manville show

Librivox: Dark House ,The by Fenn, George ManvilleJoin Now to Follow

An extremely wealthy but reclusive man has died, leaving an eccentric will which hints at great riches hidden somewhere in the house. Most of the people at the reading of the will did not know the deceased in person, but had received kindnesses from him, for instance by the payment of school and university fees. The principal beneficiary, a great-nephew, also did not know him. The only two people who really knew him were the old lawyer who dealt with his affairs, and an old Indian servant. Yet when the will had been read, and they all went to where the treasure--gold, jewels and bank-notes--were supposed to be hidden, nothing could be found. There are an unusual number of deaths, by murder and in self-defence, as the story unfolds, and we are left in total suspense until the very end of the very last chapter. The person who works out where the treasure must be, and how it got there, does not come on the scene until almost the last chapter, and even then he has to go on business to America before he can come in and explain his theory, which proves to be right. (Summary by Gutenberg)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Custom of the Country, The by Wharton, Edith show

Librivox: Custom of the Country, The by Wharton, EdithJoin Now to Follow

Edith Wharton was a novelist of manners of late 19th Century New York "Society", who spent much of her life in France. In this novel she tells the story of Undine Sprague, the thrice- (or more) married, upwardly mobile beauty from "Apex City", transplanted to New York, and finally to France, leaving the dead and wounded in the wake of her "experiments in happiness". (Summary by Karen Merline)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Morte d'Arthur, Le - Vol. 1 by Malory, Thomas, Sir show

Librivox: Morte d'Arthur, Le - Vol. 1 by Malory, Thomas, SirJoin Now to Follow

Le Morte d'Arthur (spelled Le Morte Darthur in the first printing and also in some modern editions, Middle French for la mort d'Arthur, "the death of Arthur") is Sir Thomas Malory's compilation of some French and English Arthurian romances. The book contains some of Malory's own original material (the Gareth story) and retells the older stories in light of Malory's own views and interpretations. First published in 1485 by William Caxton, Le Morte d'Arthur is perhaps the best-known work of English-language Arthurian literature today. Many modern Arthurian writers have used Malory as their source, including T. H. White for his popular The Once and Future King . (Summary from Wikipedia)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Life of Samuel Johnson Vol. I, The by Boswell, James show

Librivox: Life of Samuel Johnson Vol. I, The by Boswell, JamesJoin Now to Follow

Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson is widely considered to be the greatest English-language biography ever written. It was revolutionary in its efforts to represent Johnson as he was, celebrating his flaws as well as his genius, and in Boswell's decision to represent Johnson primarily by quoting his writings and relating personal anecdotes rather than relying on matters of public record. From the time of its publication till now, The Life of Johnson has been one of the most popular and influential books ever written. (Summary by Kirsten Ferreri.)

By LibriVox

Librivox: Multilingual Poetry Collection 009 by Various show

Librivox: Multilingual Poetry Collection 009 by VariousJoin Now to Follow

In LibriVox’s Multilingual Poetry Collection, LibriVox volunteers read their favourite public-domain poems in languages other than English. (Summary by David Barnes).

By LibriVox