CLAREMONT: The Trial show

CLAREMONT: The Trial

Summary: Ever since the shocking deaths of three young women in 1996 and 1997, the unanswered questions surrounding the Claremont serial killings have remained one of the biggest mysteries in WA history. Any hope of justice in the tragic deaths of Ciara Glennon, Sarah Spiers and Jane Rimmer seemed bleak for more than 20 years, with police coming unstuck and no sign of a breakthrough. That was until the arrest of Bradley Robert Edwards in 2016, who was subsequently charged with the trio's murders. For the past three years details about the allegations facing Mr Edwards have been in short supply as his case headed toward what has been dubbed the trial of the century. Now, we bring you in to the courtroom and walk you through all the revelations, allegations and talking points as the historic court case unfolds. Join our team of journalists and legal experts as we break down all the key information from the proceedings in Claremont: The Trial.

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 S2E103: THE SENTENCING: 'Coward' Edwards likely to die in prison | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 2920

After 20 years of hiding in plain sight, sadistic killer and brutal rapist Bradley Edwards will likely never leave jail and die without his freedom, after he was sentenced to life in prison with a minimum non-parole period of 40 years. If he makes it that long, he will be 88, taking into consideration time served. But that just means in 2060 he can apply for parole, it doesn't mean he'll be released. As Justice Hall revealed his sentence, more than a year since his trial began and almost four years to the day since he was arrested, he told Edwards he would likely die in jail. "You committed these offences as a much younger man and have had the undeserved benefit of your liberty for many years due to the fact that it took many years to identify you as the perpetrator," he said. Those offences, he committed in his 20s, but one of his victims, who was 17 at the time bravely told of how the sadistic rapist's act 25 years ago changed her, but wouldn't define her. Her powerful words left even seasoned police officers holding back tears. “the definition of a coward," The Karrakatta victim said. “He preyed on weak, vulnerable young women who didn’t stand a chance." “How pathetic. It has been much easier in terms of impact to realise there was no evil genius at work here, he slipped through the cracks because he is unremarkable.” "And now I will leave this behind. I will leave this courtroom and finally go and live my life without you in it. I will live it joyously, respectfully and gratefully for myself, my family and for the lives that were lost. I will live and you won’t." "And as one of the victims of your crimes, I hope you are treated as well in prison as you have treated us." Even though he didn't give a life without parole sentence, Lee Rimmer, Jane's sister said he was happy, and WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson spoke for a community. “It is my sincere hope, for the sake of the victims, for the sake of the families and friends and indeed for the safety of our community, that Edwards will never be released from prison,” Mr Dawson said. In this final podcast, Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke, Alison Fan and Damien Cripps digest, analyse and take in the sentence - and the case that's gripped the state for more than two decades. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2Enigma of the Dark: Claremont the Trial LIVE | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 3987

Join the Claremont in Conversation team in this special live event at the University of Western Australia. Hear stories never told in court, anecdotes from sitting days and opinions from the journalists who covered the mammoth seven-month trial. You'll also hear some details from Tim Clarke's book, Enigma of the Dark. To get a copy, head to https://subscriber.thewest.com.au/enigmaofthedark?utm_source=TheWest&utm_medium=PromoCard&utm_campaign=ClaremontBookPreOrder&utm_term=order-now&utm_content=Content or find Enigma of the Dark on Amazon. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E102: How Long Could Edwards Stay Behind Bars? | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1753

Should Bradley Edwards be allowed to participate in rehabilitation programs in prison? Or should the prison just 'throw away the key'? Legal expert Damien Cripps joins Natalie Bonjolo in this last episode until the sentencing, discussing how Edwards might be sentenced, and answer some of your questions. Damien Cripps said Edwards' sentencing will be a difficult task for Justice Hall, and discusses several avenues of how the prosecution and defence will present their cases to the judge. You've sent in some very interesting questions, and Damien Cripps gives his professional and personal opinion. We'll be back on December 23 when Bradley Edwards is sentenced on The Huntingdale attack, Karrakatta rape, and Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon's murders. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E101: Inside the MACRO Taskforce | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 4118

Former homicide detective Paul Ferguson has put away his fair share of bad guys. The retired police officer was in charge of the MACRO Taskforce when it was created, after Jane Rimmer disappeared in June 1996, but before that, he worked on, and helped catch one of WA's most infamous serial killer couples - David and Catherine Birnie. But the disappearances of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon was one of the cases that not only haunted WA, but many of the police officers who worked it. The retired detective even interviewed the man he put behind bars, David Birnie, to try and get an insight into the mind of a serial killer. He investigated when Sarah Spiers went missing. From the start, it was clear it wasn't just another missing woman. The Spiers family and police were onto it straight away. More than 2,000 posters, 20,000 flyers and 50 buses with Sarah's face were distributed throughout Perth. Police had no idea how she was abducted, or even where she was. The search spanned all over the Perth region, from Black Wall Reach, to Midland, to Serpentine Falls. Sarah had disappeared without a trace. In this podcast, Paul Ferguson reveals where he thinks Sarah Spiers is. Five months after the 18-year-old disappeared, he recalls the call he took, the call that police knew was coming, but were dreading. Another woman had gone missing. "The fact that we didn't know how that Sarah had been abducted, the fact that there'd been no commotion and the fact that her body hadn't been found was of major concern through the inquiry team and WA Police.  And then of course the worst thing that could have happened was another girl go missing from the same area," he told the Claremont in Conversation podcast team. He admitted the disappearance of Ciara Glennon was a blur, because the investigation had become so intense. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and special guests former head of MACRO Paul Ferguson and former WA Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan as they take you inside Australia's longest running and most expensive murder investigation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E100: Dr DNA: The Man Behind the Breakthrough | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1027

Bradley Edwards hid in plain sight for more than two decades, but what he didn’t realise, was that he was just simply hidden, and that meant he could still be found. His DNA was found under Ciara Glennon’s fingernails. She fought for her life, and in that fight, she scratched her killer and hid a part of him to be found by scientists years later. Dr Jonathan Whitaker is the scientist who found a male DNA profile from the microscopic DNA fragments found under Ciara Glennon’s fingernails. His testing and retesting of Ciara’s fingernail samples at FSS in the UK in 2008 was the pivotal turning point in the MACRO investigation. His new method of testing - Low Copy Number - provided the distinctive male profile which later proved to be Edwards. But at the time, he admits its significance was not immediately apparent. Dr Jonathan Whitaker speak to Tim Clarke in this episode of Claremont in Conversation: The Verdict, and tells of when he realised his find was indeed the ‘Eureka moment’ that led police to Bradley Edwards. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E99: The Hollywood Hospital Victim: In Her Own Words | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 2900

May 7, 1990 was the day that changed Wendy Davis’ life. A social worker at Hollywood Hospital, she was going about her day when Telstra worker and now convicted killer Bradley Edwards attacked her, grabbing her from behind and dragged her back towards some toilets. But she fought him off, and her evidence helped in the conviction of the Claremont Killer. But Wendy Davis is so much more than just “the Hollywood Hospital victim”. After her ordeal, she had to go on with her life, so she buried the traumatic events, until 2016 when detectives called to tell her, the man who attacked her in 1990, they think is the Claremont Serial Killer. In this episode, Wendy bravely tells her story, in her own words. The trauma she experienced, the grief for Sarah, Jane and Ciara’s families, and the anger at Telstra and Edwards is so raw, so emotional, as she tells Natalie Bonjolo and Tim Clarke her experience and why she wants an apology from Telstra, and why she thinks Edwards should have been charged with more than common assault. Wendy left the job she loved after the attack, the trauma was too much. But Edwards got to keep his job. In telling her story, Wendy said she feels like it’s been therapeutic. She said she even started jotting down her thoughts into a book, which she admitted may, or may not ever see the light of day, but detail her experiences with the attack, and the resurgence of trauma. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke as they speak to Wendy Davis about the attack which eventually linked Edwards’ name to the crimes at Huntingdale, and the DNA found from the Karrakatta rape victim and Ciara Glennon’s murder. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E98: Inside the Mind of a Killer | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 2109

Bradley Edwards will 'never' reveal the location of Sarah Spiers. That’s according to leading forensic anthropologist and criminologist Dr Xanthe Mallett. In this episode of Claremont in Conversation: The Verdict, we take you inside the mind of a killer. Joined by forensic DNA expert Brendan Chapman and forensic anthropologist, criminologist Dr Xanthe Mallett, our guests analyse Bradley Robert Edwards fits the profile of a psychopath and what makes someone kill. During his police interview, Bradley Edwards was seen to barely show any emotion as he was told about the horrific final moments of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, but when he was asked about his family, he seemed animated. Dr Xanthe Mallett tells the podcast team psychopaths, a group which she included Edwards in, commonly display lack of emotion, but do when they’re triggered. Usually the only people who see those triggers are their victims. The prosecution laid out in the first few months of the trial, their idea of what those triggers could have been - emotional upsets - the ‘third wheel’ that moved into Edwards’ and his first wife’s home, her affair with the third wheel, the pregnancy and the sale of their marital home. As Tim Clarke explains, the prosecution abandoned this theory towards the end of the trial, but he believed it wasn’t because they didn’t think it was accurate anymore, rather, their DNA case was strong enough without it. Before a body was even found, and WA realised there was a killer roaming the streets of Claremont, police had already made links between the disappearance of the Karrakatta rape victim, Sarah Spiers and Jane Rimmer, and that was through the forensic process of victimology. But even with a police investigation linking the disappearance of Sarah Spiers and the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, without a body, Justice Hall didn’t find there was enough evidence to convict Edwards of her murder too. Brendan Chapman explains why, even if a miracle happens, and Sarah Spiers’ remains are found, while it would be extremely hard to find any evidence from it, it wouldn’t be impossible - although most of it would still be circumstantial. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke, Brendan Chapman and Xanthe Mallett as they try and delve inside the mind of a killer. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E97: The Verdict Analysis with Tom Percy | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1500

Bradley Robert Edwards killed Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon. Over the last two days, we’ve heard from the families of those two young, vibrant women taken too soon, their grief unimaginable as their daughters’ killer has been unmasked. But for the family of another young and vibrant daughter, sister and friend, yesterday’s verdict came with more heartbreak. The family of Sarah Spiers don’t have closure. They don’t have her body. They’ve never been able to say goodbye. Today, the podcast team are joined by leading barrister Tom Percy QC, who tells us that Justice Hall could have found Bradley Edwards guilty of Sarah Spiers’ murder. A bitter pill to swallow for the West Australian public. The father of Ciara Glennon spoke publicly about the outcome today. He expressed his sorrow for the family of Sarah Spiers, whose body has never been found. Dennis Glennon said he always knew Ciara would fight for her life, but little did he know that her prolific final fight would lead to the massive DNA breakthrough that would eventually catch her killer. Despite the police and PathWest errors, Dennis Glennon said he and his family have no criticisms of detectives or scientists. In this episode, Tom Percy said we must never forget the errors of police, and what has previously been called ‘tunnel vision’ by MACRO detectives in following Lance Williams for years. Join the Claremont in Conversation team as they analyse the verdict, and have a lively discussion about the possibility of appeals, double jeopardy and Tom Percy’s opinion on why Edwards seemed to show little emotion throughout his trial. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E96: Justice delivered: THE VERDICT | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 3302

The Claremont Killer has been revealed. Bradley Robert Edwards terrorised Perth for two decades, he sparked fear into the hearts of people in Claremont and tore apart families. As WA’s Police Commissioner said outside court today, “Bradley Edwards can now be called for what he is - a brutal rapist and a murderer.” 24 years of heartbreak for the families of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, today, some closure for two of those families. Bradley Edwards was found guilty of killing Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon - shaking his head as the verdict was read out. But it was a bitter-sweet verdict today, as Justice Hall said he couldn’t find, beyond reasonable doubt, that the man who killed Jane and Ciara also killed Sarah Spiers. Police vowing today, they will never stop trying to find her body and they will never stop trying to get answers for her family. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Damien Cripps as they digest the verdict that WA has waited 24 years for, and share the outpouring of emotion that’s swept through the state in the wake of the verdict. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2Bonus Episode: The Moment of Truth upon Us | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 2698

Is Bradley Robert Edwards guilty or not guilty? Only one person knows what the answer to that question is, and he’s taken 12 weeks to make it. But on Thursday September 24, the world will find out. Justice Stephen Hall has the weight of two decades of fear, mystery and grief on his shoulders, and in a week, he’ll have eyes of West Australians on him. Claremont In Conversation is back with the biggest moments of the trial of the century, a week out from the verdict. In this bonus episode, Tim Clarke says he’s nervous, and it’s understandable why. A lot of people close to, or invested in this trial are also nervous, because in a week’s time, West Australians will find out if the man standing trial for the last seven months is the Claremont Serial Killer. But it represents much more than a seven-month trial. As we’ve found out over the course of the last few months, the Claremont Serial Killings case never went cold. Police, families and scientists have been working on the case for the last 24 years. It was a trial that was so important, not even a global pandemic could stop it, a trial that will literally stop traffic, when road works going on outside the court will stop for day. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they take you through what to expect next week and what it will mean for judicial history after it’s all over. If you have any questions for the Claremont in Conversation podcast team, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au  If you’re new to the Claremont podcast, or want a trial refresher, head to our JUMP IN NOW episodes to hear a detailed run through of the evidence. The West Australian has also released a two-part video series, as Tim Clarke takes you through the areas which are key to the trial, from Claremont, where the women went missing, to Hollywood hospital and to the sites were Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies were found. To watch those videos, head to: Part 1: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-on-a-visual-tour-of-claremont-ng-b881516606z Part 2: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-to-wellard-and-eglington-ng-b881517153z See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2Bonus Episode: What's Next? | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 2416

95 trial days and 95 episodes (plus a few bonus ones) later, WA's trial of the century has officially come to a close. The trial has been harrowing at times, it's been informative and eye-opening, but ultimately heartbreaking for the families and the three women who's lives were tragically taken too soon. So, what happens next? Justice Stephen Hall reserved his judgement until September 24, and will spend the next three months carefully analysing every piece of evidence, every witness statement and every conclusion both the prosecution and defence asked him to make - all to decide if Bradley Robert Edwards is the Claremont Serial Killer. In this bonus episode, Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke, Alison Fan and producer Kate Ryan discuss the trial, how they are feeling following the Australia’s longest running and most expensive criminal investigation, and they’re expecting when the verdict day comes. Thank you to the podcast contributors Damien Cripps, Brendan Chapman and Tom Percy QC, all who gave their time to help us understand the concepts of the trial and the complicated science. And a massive thank you to The West Australian’s Emily Moulton, who worked tirelessly for 95 days live blogging every moment of the trial, without which a daily podcast would have been a lot harder to put together. Catch up on the Claremont Serial Killings trial at thewest.com.au and stay tuned to the Claremont in Conversation podcast for more bonus episodes over the next few months. For those wanting more on WA’s trial of the century, The West Australian has released a two-part video series, as Tim Clarke takes you through the areas which are key to the trial, from Claremont, where the women went missing, to Hollywood hospital and to the sites were Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies were found. To watch those videos, head to: Part 1: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-on-a-visual-tour-of-claremont-ng-b881516606z Part 2: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-to-wellard-and-eglington-ng-b881517153z See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E95: It’s Up to Justice Hall Now | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1526

Everything’s been said, the evidence is out in the open and now Justice Hall has a massive task ahead of him. After 95 days and more than 200 witnesses, WA’s trial of the century -  the Claremont Serial Killings trial has come to a close, with the defence finishing their closing statement with the words, “A conviction founded on inadequate evidence would not constitute proper closure". Using the final day of his closing statements to focus on the fibre case against his client, Paul Yovich put forward a scenario of contamination theory, that Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon could have picked up the same fibres nine months apart through ‘coincidence’. He also conceded the person who killed Jane also killed Ciara, but  that person wasn’t Bradley Edwards. He also said there’s no evidence that person also abducted and killed Sarah Spiers. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they discuss the final day of this mammoth trial, and how the victim’s families must be feeling, after the trial of the man accused of the murders more than two decades ago. If you have any questions for the Claremont in Conversation podcast team, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au The West Australian has also released a two-part video series, as Tim Clarke takes you through the areas which are key to the trial, from Claremont, where the women went missing, to Hollywood hospital and to the sites were Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies were found. To watch those videos, head to: Part 1: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-on-a-visual-tour-of-claremont-ng-b881516606z Part 2: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-to-wellard-and-eglington-ng-b881517153z See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E94: The Closing Statements: A New Alibi | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1242

On Day 94 of the trial, and the fourth day of Paul Yovich’s closing statements, the defence focussed on Ciara Glennon’s disappearance. The court had previously been told the night the she disappeared, the accused Claremont Serial Killer Bradley Edwards was supposed to be in Dawesville seeing friends, but didn’t show up until the next morning. Those friends told the court the reason he gave for his lateness was because he was ‘trying to reconcile with his wife’. The prosecution say that night he killed Ciara Glennon and dumped her body in Eglington. But the defence put up a different reason - those witness’s memories were inaccurate and Bradley Edwards was actually breaking up with his girlfriend. But that girlfriend, who gave evidence on day 4 of the trial (titled Ex Wife and Sex Lives for a catch up) said he broke up with her in April, telling her he’d met someone else. The court heard he met his second wife on April 1. Justice Hall was quick with questions and queries for Paul Yovich, telling the defence lawyer that didn’t make sense. As Tim Clarke and Alison Fan discuss in this episode, when Bradley Edwards broke up with that girlfriend, he told her the name of the woman he was leaving her for. If that happened in March, it would have been a premonition. Paul Yovich also questioned why, if he did it, he would drive more than 100 kilometres out of his way to dump a body - to which Justice Hall quickly replied that if he did it, he probably wanted to distance himself from the crime scene as much as possible. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they discuss the questions Paul Yovich brought up surrounding Ciara Glennon’s disappearance. If you have any questions for the Claremont in Conversation podcast team, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au The West Australian has also released a two-part video series, as Tim Clarke takes you through the areas which are key to the trial, from Claremont, where the women went missing, to Hollywood hospital and to the sites were Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies were found. To watch those videos, head to: Part 1: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-on-a-visual-tour-of-claremont-ng-b881516606z Part 2: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-to-wellard-and-eglington-ng-b881517153z See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E93: The Closing Statements: Mr Edwards ‘Should be Acquitted’ of Killing Sarah | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 2162

Paul Yovich told the court Sarah Spiers was the victim of a grave crime, but Bradley Edwards didn’t commit that crime. Making sure to tell the court he didn’t “intend to trivialise Ms Spiers’ death, or disrespect her. Quite the contrary.” He told the court Sarah Spiers was the victim of a grave crime, ‘a blameless victim’. The 18-year-old called for a taxi at 2.06am in the early hours of January 27, 1996. A taxi arrived three minutes later, but she was gone, and was never seen again. Previous witnesses have told Mr Edwards was at work early the next morning. Paul Yovich said logic dictates that it couldn’t be possible for Bradley Edwards could have killed Sarah Spiers, because it would have left just a six-hour window for him to kill and dispose of his victim, then arrive at work at 7.30 the next morning. But another witness, who kept journals, told the court Mr Edwards may have got to work later that morning. As far as what he did the night before, Alison Fan describes in this episode that Paul Yovich was quite blunt in some of his statements around Bradley Edwards’ the night Sarah disappeared, saying “We don’t know and you can’t speculate” and “You can’t fix the evidence to fit the case.” He asked, why would he choose that night above all others? And as we know, the prosecution have abandoned the emotional turmoil evidence, which the state had previously relied on, saying that Bradley Edwards was abandoned by his first wife, who had left him for another man, that night she rejected him. But that evidence can’t be used anymore. Bradley Edwards’ defence lawyer questioned the timeline the prosecution mapped out for how they say Sarah disappeared. In the early hours of January 27, 1996, Sarah Spiers made a phone call from a phone box in Claremont, to go to Mosman Park at 2.06am. 3 minutes later, the taxi arrived but she was gone. Mosman Park resident, Wayne Stewart gave evidence that he heard a woman’s blood-curdling scream at around 3am that same morning, and he saw a car under a street light. Mr Yovich pointed out that Mosman Park is around a 10-minute drive from Claremont, but the screams were heard at around 3am - around an hour after Sarah was last seen. He also said Justice Hall could not find that this evidence could prove that the screams came from Sarah, or that the car belonged to Bradley Edwards. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Alison Fan as they dissect the fourth day of the defence’s closing statements. If you have any questions for the Claremont in Conversation podcast team, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au The West Australian has also released a two-part video series, as Tim Clarke takes you through the areas which are key to the trial, from Claremont, where the women went missing, to Hollywood hospital and to the sites were Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies were found. To watch those videos, head to: Part 1: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-on-a-visual-tour-of-claremont-ng-b881516606z Part 2: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-to-wellard-and-eglington-ng-b881517153z See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

 S2E92: The Closing Statements: “If He Wanted to Kill Her, She’d be Dead” | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 1883

The defence told court today that Bradley Edwards did not intend to kill his rape victim. That he planned his attack carefully and carried it out efficiently, but murder was not in that plan. During their closing statements, the prosecution said the Telstra worker intended to kill his rape victim, but was spooked by a passing security officer, dumped his victim in the bushes and left with the intention of coming back to finish his crime. But the rape victim, who had pretended to be unconscious, ran for help when she realised her attacker was gone. She said in one of her statements to police in the days after the attack, she thought she was going to die. As Tim Clarke explains in this episode, for the victim, who was in court, today would have been difficult to hear her account of the terrifying attack being scrutinised. Paul Yovich stressed that they weren’t questioning her account of what happened, and as Tim Clarke says he seemed sympathetic to the fact it was a very serious crime. But his argument was Bradley Edwards is a sexually motivated attacker, but not a murderer. The third day of the defence’s closing argument focussed on trying to prove just that, why the Karrakatta rape and the murders are different - through attempting to pick apart the fibre evidence, witness statements and the prosecution’s propensity evidence. Namely, that the Karrakatta rape victim was not killed after her horrific ordeal. Defence lawyer Paul Yovich also pointed to differences in the circumstances surrounding the rape and the murders. He told the court the Karrakatta rape victim was abducted in a ‘blitz-style attack’, whereas the prosecution say at least Jane Rimmer and Ciara Rimmer were lured into the car, and there was no evidence that Jane or Ciara were sexually assaulted, however, the court was previously told because of the level of decomposition of their bodies, while there was no evidence of sexual assault, that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen. The two cases, now poles apart tell two very different stories. As Damien Cripps explains, this would be an extremely difficult task for Justice Hall to undertake, especially when evidence used by the prosecution, the Telstra Living Witness project was seen by the defence as a weakness to the prosecution, rather than strengthening their case. Join Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke and Damien Cripps as they discuss day 92 of the Claremont Serial Killings Trial. If you have any questions for the Claremont in Conversation podcast team, send them in to claremontpodcast@wanews.com.au The West Australian has also released a two-part video series, as Tim Clarke takes you through the areas which are key to the trial, from Claremont, where the women went missing, to Hollywood hospital and to the sites were Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon’s bodies were found. To watch those videos, head to: Part 1: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-on-a-visual-tour-of-claremont-ng-b881516606z Part 2: https://thewest.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-serial-killings-trial-tim-clarke-takes-you-to-wellard-and-eglington-ng-b881517153z See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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