Coaching for Leaders show

Coaching for Leaders

Summary: Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 30 million downloads and the #1 search result for management on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

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Podcasts:

 192R: How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 39:05

This is a re-airing of episode 192. New episodes return on Monday, August 14th. Susan Gerke: GO Team Resources Susan Gerke has been the president of Gerke Consulting & Development. She has worked with global teams and has certified facilitators around the world to deliver management, leadership, and team offerings. Susan is co-creator of GO Team, a training suite for organizations to power team performance. Key Points Don’t create guidelines yourself and give them to the team. A starting point for how to create team guidelines is what did not work well on a previous team. The interpersonal dynamics that emerge are more critical than the guidelines themselves. Aim to create no more than 8 guidelines. Disagreement is the sign of a healthy team. Continue to revisit guidelines in future meetings and team milestone (new members join or the team, change to team composition or purpose) Resources Mentioned GO Team Resources Related Episodes The Four Unique Types of Teams, with Susan Gerke (episode 138) How Great Teams Find Purpose, with David Burkus (episode 481) How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537) How Top Leaders Influence Great Teamwork, with Scott Keller (episode 585) How to Help Team Members Find the Right Work, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 610) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 640: How to Bring a Large Team Together, with Tom Burbage | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 39:03

Tom Burbage: F-35 Tom Burbage retired from the Lockheed Martin Corporation in 2013. He was the President of the Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems Company and the Executive VP/GM for both the USAF F-22 Raptor and the multi-service, allied next generation fighter, the F-35. Prior to joining Lockheed, Tom was a Naval Aviator, completing the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School in 1975. He has accumulated more than 3,000 hours in 38 different types of military aircraft. As a reservist he retired as a Navy Captain in 1994. Tom has received numerous industry awards, including the U.S. Naval Academy/Harvard Business Review Award for Ethical Leadership; the Aerospace Industry Personality of the Year; the Society of Automotive Engineers Leadership in Aerospace Award; and many others. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society in the United Kingdom. He is co-author along with Betsy Clark and Adrian Pitman of the book F-35: The Inside Story of the Lightning II. Sometimes we find ourselves leading a very large team that isn’t used to working together. That happened to Tom who was the general manager of the F-35 fighter jet. In this conversation, we explore how to bring together many stakeholders in order to do something bigger than any one of them could do alone. Key Points Solicit and listen to feedback on what didn’t work in past situations. Establish behavior norms and expectations and continue coming back to them. When disagreements happen, resolve them in the context of these norms. Consider including customers in major meetings, so struggles are shared transparently with all stakeholders. Behavior norms and expectations were established globally and referenced in most formal interactions. When flare ups happened, they were often settled quickly in the spirit of the norms. A “one team” concept was used to unify people from formerly competing organizations to align them to the nobler motive. Resources Mentioned F-35: The Inside Story of the Lightning II* by Tom Burbage, Betsy Clark, and Adrian Pitman Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Build a Coaching Culture, with Andrea Wanerstrand (episode 501) How Top Leaders Influence Great Teamwork, with Scott Keller (episode 585) How to Lead Better Through Complexity, with Jennifer Garvey Berger (episode 613) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 639: Supporting Return to Work After Maternity Leave, with Danna Greenberg | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 38:42

Danna Greenberg: Maternal Optimism Danna Greenberg is the Walter H. Carpenter Professor of Organizational Behavior at Babson College. Her main area of research focuses on understanding the intersection between individuals' work and non-work lives as they move through their career. Her scholarship is guided by the belief that individuals can and should be able to live full lives at work and at home and that by challenging current assumptions regarding work we can find better ways for businesses, families, and communities to thrive. Her other research stream centers on the scholarship of teaching and learning. Here she is focused on the continued changing landscape of higher education as it pertains to how we teach, what we teach, and how to define the lives of academics. Danna has published more than 30 articles and book chapters in leading journals including Academy of Management Journal, Human Resource Management, and Academy of Management Learning and Education. She is the co-author with Jamie Ladge of Maternal Optimism: Forging Positive Paths Through Work and Motherhood*. When women return to work after a baby, there’s a lot our society implies about how that’s supposed to look. Danna’s research finds that this can look very different for every family. On this episode, a few things that women, their partners, and their managers can do to support a better transition in returning to work. Key Points Over 70% of mothers in the United States return to work after having children. There tends to be a “guilt and anguish” script in the popular media about women returning to work after a maternity leave. That’s absolutely true for some women (especially those with fewer resources) but other women have very different experiences. Managers can help by opening dialogue about what’s ideal to support a woman and her family during and after maternity leave. Comments like “I am so impressed by how you are going to do it all!” are often well-intended but can reinforce views that might not be true for a woman or her family. Focus praise at work on work, not parenting. Men may be more likely to listen to the challenges working mother face when other men surface them. Male managers can take the lead on this. During leave, mothers can help create a foundation of shared parenting (if that’s their choice) by engaging their partners in substantial ways in childcare and limit gatekeeping. Resources Mentioned Maternal Optimism: Forging Positive Paths Through Work and Motherhood* by Jamie Ladge and Danna Greenberg Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Reduce Drama With Kids, with Tina Payne Bryson (episode 310) Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417) How to Create Inclusive Hiring Practices, with Ruchika Tulshyan (episode 589) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 638: Giving Up on Getting It All Done, with Bonni Stachowiak | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 39:54

Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Jose asked about how to balance professional and personal responsibilities and get it all done. Jordan mentioned getting passed up for a promotion twice and wondering what suggestions we have on the feedback they have received. Ahmad asked us about resources for supporting high performances and team members who are struggling. Jenna shared a distinction between tuition reimbursement and tuition assistance that Dave expanded on. Resources Mentioned Getting Things Done* by David Allen Leadership Story Deck* by David Hutchens Start With Why* by Simon Sinek Hope for the Flowers* by Trina Paulus The Empowered Manager* by Peter Block Kim Scott’s distinction on Superstars vs. Rock Stars CliftonStrengths by Gallup Related Episodes How to Get Way Better at Accepting Feedback, with Sheila Heen (episode 143) Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184) Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319) Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) The Four Storytelling Mistakes Leaders Make, with David Hutchens (episode 553) How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian (episode 567) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 637: How to Handle Pushback From Difficult Askers, with Vanessa Patrick | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 36:41

Vanessa Patrick: The Power of Saying No Vanessa Patrick is the Associate Dean for Research, Executive Director of Doctoral Programs, a Bauer Professor of Marketing and lead faculty of the Executive Women in Leadership Program at the Bauer School of Business at the University of Houston. She has been recognized with a number of awards for both scholarship and teaching and was named one of the top 50 most productive marketing scholars worldwide by the DocSig of the American Marketing Association. Vanessa was appointed as a Fulbright Specialist (2019-24) by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. She is a prominent scholar in her field and serves on editorial and policy boards of leading academic journals. She is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Marketing Research and the Journal of Marketing and she's the author of The Power of Saying No: The New Science of How to Say No That Puts You in Charge of Your Life*. Most leaders know that it’s important to say no to requests that aren’t the right use of time and resources. But how do you navigate this when the other party is likely to respond in a difficult way? In this conversation, Vanessa and I explore the patterns of difficult askers and how we can do a better job of responding when we’re interacting with them. Key Points We all have both marigolds and walnut trees in our lives. Marigold protect and strengthen us - walnut trees crowd out our time and interfere. Difficult askers often confront us with face-to-face requests, use their home court advantage, and insist on an immediate response. Pushback is normal and expected. It’s helpful to view it as a hurdle to overcome vs. something to avoid. Either way, we will spend the energy. Resentment is a helpful indicator that difficult askers are taking too much power. Establish personal polices that provide guidelines so you can proactively come back to values when considering requests. It’s helpful to consider advance requests in the context of fulfilling the commitment immediately, otherwise we’ll continue to feel the pressure of resentment and Resources Mentioned The Power of Saying No: The New Science of How to Say No That Puts You in Charge of Your Life* by Vanessa Patrick Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Say No Without Saying No, with Lois Frankel (episode 471) How to Speak Up, with Connson Locke (episode 546) How to Help People Speak Truth to Power, with Megan Reitz (episode 597) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 636: The Value of Consistency Through Inflection Points, Liz Anderson | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 32:02

Liz Anderson: The PreSales Path Liz Anderson has extensive experience as a solutions engineering leader and is the founder of the PreSales Path. She's also an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this SaturdayCast, Liz and I discuss the inflection points she’s experienced in the past year, how intentional focus on her vision and identity helped move her forward, and the value of consistency through it all. Key Points Professional development is about finding the starting points and then adapting as you go. Once you decide on a new identity and direction, the indicators start to emerge on where to go next. When your heart and intention are in the right place, the tactical path is still not easy, but it is clearer. Resources Mentioned Liz Anderson Related Episodes How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) How to Get Moving, with Gladys McGarey (episode 631) How to Get Traction With a New Habit (audio course) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 635: How to Start Better With Peers, with Michael Bungay Stanier | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 39:14

Michael Bungay Stanier: How to Work with (Almost) Anyone Michael Bungay Stanier is the author of eight books, including The Coaching Habit, which has sold more than a million copies and is the best-selling book on coaching this century. Most recently he wrote How to Begin, and back in 2011 he created and edited End Malaria, a book written in partnership with Seth Godin that raised more than $400k for Malaria No More. Michael is the founder Box of Crayons, a learning and development company that’s trained thousands of people around the world to be more coach-like. He has been featured in many publications including Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Fast Company. His TEDx Talk on Taming Your Advice Monster has been viewed more than a million times. Michael's newest book is How to Work with (Almost) Anyone: Building the Best Possible Relationship*. Most leaders recognize the critical nature of healthy, peer relationships. Yet, few leaders lay an intentional foundation for success as those relationships start. In this episode, Michael and I discuss how to start with peers using the five questions in a Keystone Conversation. Key Points Nobody really like to say hello but everyone likes to be greeted. Make a decision to be the person that begins. Preparing thoughtful responses to the five questions in a Keystone Conversation will help you come to a dialogue in an authentic and vulnerable way. The responses themselves aren’t as critical as the process itself. By entering into a keystone conversation, you are laying the foundation for future dialogue and the best possible relationship. The five questions of a Keystone Conversation: The Amplify Question: What’s your best? The Steady Question: What are your practices and preferences? The Good Date Question: What can you learn from successful past relationships? The Bad Date Question: What can you learn from frustrating past relationships? The Repair Question: How will you fix it when things go wrong? Resources Mentioned Preorder Michael’s book at bestpossiblerelationship.com Bonus audio: Michael’s process for writing this book (12 minutes) Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) How to Involve Stakeholders in Decisions, with Eric Pliner (episode 586) How to Start a Big Leadership Role, with Carol Kauffman (episode 617) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 634: The Value of Bittersweet Leadership, with Susan Cain | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 37:45

Susan Cain: Bittersweet Susan Cain is the author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, which spent seven years on The New York Times bestseller list and has been translated into 40 languages. It was named the #1 best book of the year by Fast Company, which also named Susan one of its Most Creative People in Business. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, and many other publications. Her record-smashing TED Talk has been viewed over 30 million times and was named by Bill Gates one of his all-time favorite talks. Susan has also spoken at Microsoft, Google, the U.S. Treasury, the S.E.C., Harvard, Yale, West Point, and the US Naval Academy. She received Harvard Law School’s Celebration Award for Thought Leadership, the Toastmasters International Golden Gavel Award for Communication and Leadership, and was named one of the world’s top 50 Leadership and Management Experts by Inc. She is now also the author of the bestselling book Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Make Us Whole*. We’ve all heard the value of positive thinking and aiming for happiness, but we don’t often think about the value of sorrow — and rarely in the context of leadership. In this conversation, Susan returns to the podcast to explore how the full spectrum of who we are can help us live — and lead - just a bit better. Key Points We espouse the value of happiness and positive thinking but don’t often recognize the value of appreciating sorrow and pain. Words like “pain” and “suffering” tend to not show up in our workplaces, even when that’s clearly what’s being experienced. Instead, these realities are often substituted with words like “anger” or “frustration.” Yes we should focus on our strengths, but beware of confusing a bittersweet temperament or sadness, with weakness. Having power or feeling superior may prevent us from seeing others sadness — or even our own. Leaders who can embrace humility often find that results follow too. The physical act of bowing can help with humility, as does capturing in writing moments of compassion (either from others or for others), as well as a focus on self-compassion. Resources Mentioned Preorder Bittersweet for a free book plate from Susan Empathy: The Human Connection to Patient Care by The Cleveland Clinic The Kindred Letters by Susan Cain Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, with Susan Cain (episode 44) Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner (episode 254) Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 633: The Mindset to Help Your Organization Grow, with Tiffani Bova | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 39:08

Tiffani Bova: The Experience Mindset Tiffani Bova is the global customer growth and innovation evangelist at Salesforce, and The Wall Street Journal bestselling author of Growth IQ. Over the past two decades, she has led large revenue-producing divisions at businesses ranging from start-ups to the Fortune 500. As a Research Fellow at Gartner, her cutting-edge insights helped Microsoft, Cisco, Salesforce, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Oracle, and many other prominent companies expand their market share and grow their revenues. She has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50 twice and she's the host of the podcast What’s Next! with Tiffani Bova. She is the author of The Experience Mindset: Changing the Way You Think About Growth*. While many organizations espouse that employees are their greatest asset, most senior leaders prioritize customer needs above all else. Data clearly shows that balancing great employee experience along with a quality customer experience drives better results. In this conversation, Tiffani and I discuss the mindset and initial steps that leaders can take to improve the experience for both employees and customers. Key Points In recent decades, we’ve been in the mindset of customer-first. Today, the biggest threat to organizations is worker unhappiness. While almost every organization espouses the importance of employees, few executive leaders can identify who “owns” the employee experience in their organization. In contrast, almost every organization has a clearly defined customer experience owner. Proper investments in technology are often an obstacle to an ideal employee experience. Getting better at this means that senior leaders in human resources, information technology, and customer experience must work together to help impact line up with intention. Three starting points for better employee experience are: reviewing data for customer experience and compare it to the trends for employee experience, utilizing employee advisory boards for a voice in emerging strategy, and reviewing employee survey results to determine what findings have been addressed. Getting better at balancing customer experience and employee experience means moving away from an expert’s mindset and towards a beginner’s mindset. Resources Mentioned The Experience Mindset: Changing the Way You Think About Growth* by Tiffani Bova Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Discover What People Want, with Tiziana Casciaro (episode 565) Gallup’s Insights on Addressing Unhappiness, with Jon Clifton (episode 601) How to Solve the Toughest Problems, with Wendy Smith (episode 612) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 632: Moving Towards Meetings of Significance, with Seth Godin | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 39:06

Seth Godin: The Song of Significance Seth Godin is the author of 21 international bestsellers that have changed the way people think about work. His books have been translated into 38 languages. Seth writes one of the most popular marketing blogs in the world, and two of his TED talks are among the most popular of all time. He is the founder of the altMBA, the social media pioneer Squidoo, and Yoyodyne, one of the first internet companies. His blog is at seths.blog and his newest book is The Song of Significance: A New Manifesto for Teams*. Seth says that the foundation of all real skills is the confidence and permission to talk to each another. No place is that more apparent than in our meetings. On this episode, Seth returns to help us move towards meetings of significance. Key Points The song of significance is about work that matters, being part of something bigger than each one of us, and doing things we’re proud of. Many organizations and leaders hold meetings, but they are often reports and lectures. Meetings of significance are conversations. Despite knowing the critical important of conversations, we tend to resist them in our roles. Our work is to begin those conversations. Start with agreement on what a meeting is how we do work that matters through it. The problem is rarely with Zoom. The problem is how you show up to facilitate the meeting. Create the culture you need to serve people well by setting the tone for it. You have more power than you think. Resources Mentioned The Song of Significance: A New Manifesto for Teams* by Seth Godin Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) How to Lead Meetings That Get Results, with Mamie Kanfer Stewart (episode 358) How to Use Power Responsibly, with Vanessa Bohns (episode 551) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 631: How to Get Moving, with Gladys McGarey | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 29:10

Gladys McGarey: The Well-Lived Life Gladys McGarey is 102 years old and a still-practicing doctor. Recognized as a pioneer of the allopathic and holistic medical movements, she is also a founding diplomat of the American Board of Holistic Medicine. She is the cofounder and past president of the American Holistic Medical Association, as well as the cofounder of the Academy of Parapsychology and Medicine and the founder of The International Academy of Clinical Hypnosis. Gladys lives and works in Scottsdale, Arizona, where for many years she shared a medical practice with her daughter. She currently has a medical consulting practice, maintains a healthy diet, and enjoys a good piece of cake every now and then. She has spoken at TEDx and is the author of The Well-Lived Life: A 102-Year Old Doctor's Six Secrets to Health and Happiness at Any Age*. Our efforts in leadership development, personal growth, or getting better at anything, are all about starting. In this conversation, Gladys and I discuss the critical nature of movement in our lives and work. We also explore how to identify where to start and why it’s more about beginning that finishing. Key Points All life needs to move. If we're not moving, we can't function. Stuckness is an illusion. If we know what to look for, movement is all around us and within us. A flashlight in the dark can only see a few steps ahead — but that’s enough to move in the right direction and begin seeing more. Look for the trickle around the dam. Noticing where movement already is will often be the starting point to go further. Doctors don’t heal patients, only patients can heal themselves. Pay attention to beginning instead of finishing. Resources Mentioned The Well-Lived Life: A 102-Year Old Doctor's Six Secrets to Health and Happiness at Any Age* by Gladys McGarey Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Tame Your Inner Critic, with Tara Mohr (episode 232) Leadership Means You Go First, with Keith Ferrazzi (episode 488) How to Make Progress When Starting Something New, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 562) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 630: Better Ways to Lead Brainstorming, with Jeremy Utley | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 39:48

Jeremy Utley: Ideaflow Jeremy Utley is the Director of Executive Education at the Stanford d.school, and an Adjunct Professor at Stanford’s School of Engineering, where he has earned multiple favorite professor distinctions from graduate programs. He co-teaches two celebrated courses, Leading Disruptive Innovation (d.leadership) and LaunchPad, which focus on creating real-world impact with the tools of design & innovation. He is also on the teaching teams of d.org, an organizational design course, and Transformative Design, a course that turns the tools of design onto graduate students’ lives. One of the most prodigious collaborators at the d.school, Jeremy has taught alongside the likes of Lecrae, Dan Ariely, Laszlo Bock, and Greg McKeown. He is the author along with Perry Klebahn of Ideaflow: The Only Business Metric That Matters. Brainstorming sessions often emerge to address a problem requiring new ideas or innovation. However, the way many of us approach brainstorming vastly limits what’s possible for our teams and organizations. In this conversation, Jeremy and I discuss where leaders go wrong and some of the most helpful mindsets and tactics to do better. Key Points We tend to like cognitive closure. That often stops us from moving forward more substantially during brainstorming. The Idea Ratio shows that 2000 ideas are needed for every one idea that goes to market. Most teams and organizations vastly underestimate this. Set the expectation that brainstorming is a process, not a single event. That will help you surface vastly more useful ideas. Gather initial suggestions before a session to avoid favoring extroverts and early anchoring on what’s said initially. A useful way to make this is ask the language, “How might we…?” Warm-up exercises can substantially help put team members in the right mindset for creativity, especially for those with busy schedules moving between contexts. Resources Mentioned Ideaflow: The Only Business Metric That Matters by Jeremy Utley and Perry Klebahn Jeremy Utley's website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Be Present, with Dan O’Connor (episode 399) The Way to Nurture New Ideas, with Safi Bahcall (episode 418) How to Build an Invincible Company, with Alex Osterwalder (episode 470) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 629: How to Grow Your Business, with Donald Miller | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 39:25

Donald Miller: How to Grow Your Small Business Donald Miller is The New York Times bestselling author of Building a StoryBrand and Business Made Simple. He has helped thousands of businesses grow with his powerful framework. In 2010, Don started the business he’d always dreamed of. Although his business was doing ok, he quickly realized it wasn’t what he thought it would be. Everything depended on him, and he was drowning in the mundane day-to-day. For years, his business struggled to produce dependable, predictable results. Over years of fits and false starts, Don grew his business from nothing to nearly $20 million. In the end, he realized there were six key parts of a business, and if they were managed well, the business would fly far and fast. He’s captured those lessons in his book How to Grow Your Small Business: A 6-Step Plan to Help Your Business Take Off*. A huge percentage of businesses fail before they have any significant success. One key trigger is failure to market the business effectively. In this conversation Donald and I discuss how to power the marketing engine of your business by using the key elements of the StoryBrand framework. Key Points Most small businesses think more about how their marketing will look rather than what their marketing will say. People are attracted to what helps them survive and thrive…and it helps to communicate those message simply. People buy products and services to solve problems, not because they care that much about the business. The customer is the hero. Never play the hero; always play the guide. People who are insecure talk about themselves. People who are confident talk about others. Talk about yourself only in the context of how it helps the customer. Resources Mentioned How to Grow Your Small Business: A 6-Step Plan to Help Your Business Take Off* by Donald Miller Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Serve Others Through Marketing, with Seth Godin (episode 381) How Leaders Build, with Guy Raz (episode 491) How to Quit Bad Stuff Faster, with Annie Duke (episode 607) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 628: How to Read an Income Statement, with Brian Feroldi | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 38:44

Brian Feroldi: Financial Statements Explained Simply Brian Feroldi is a financial educator, YouTuber, and author. He has been intensely interested in money, personal finance, and investing ever since he graduated from college. His mission statement is to spread financial wellness. He loves to help other people do better with their money, especially their investments. Brian has written more than 3,000 articles on stocks, investing, and personal finance for The Motley Fool. In 2022, Brian’s book Why Does The Stock Market Go Up? was published. The mission of the book is to demystify the stock market. It was written to explain how the market works in plain English. He's also the co-creator of the course, Financial Statements Explained Simply. Most of us are not accountants, but whether you work in a small business, a large corporation, a non-profit, or a government agency, the numbers define what resources that we have. Being able to understand and speak the language of financial statements is essential for leaders who want to influence decisions. In this episode, Brian and I review how to understand and read one of the most important reports for any organization: the income statement. Key Points A few hours of focus on the fundamentals of financial statement can provide you understanding and influence throughout your career. An income statement (also called a profit and loss statement or P&L) shows revenue, expenses, and profit over a period of time. It’s similar to your personal budget. Revenue minus cost of goods sold is gross profit. Subtracting operation expenses from gross profit give you an organization’s operating income or EBIT (earnings before income and taxes). Depreciation spreads out the cost of tangible assets (equipment, vehicles, buildings) their useful lives. Amortization does the same thing for intangible assets (loans, copyrights, patents). The “bottom line” is literally the bottom line at the end, either net income or net loss. Resources Mentioned Brian Feroldi’s newsletter Financial Statements Explained Simply (course) Related Episodes Improve Your Financial Intelligence, with Joe Knight (episode 244) How to Approach Corporate Budgeting, with Jody Wodrich (episode 355) Dumb Things Smart People Do With Money, with Jill Schlesinger (episode 396) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

 627: How to Influence Through Your Questions, with Kwame Christian | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 39:23

Kwame Christian: American Negotiation Institute Kwame Christian is a best-selling author, business lawyer, and CEO of the American Negotiation Institute. Following the viral success of his TED talk, Kwame released his best-seller Finding Confidence in Conflict: How to Negotiate Anything and Live Your Best Life back in 2018. He’s also a regular Contributor for Forbes and the host of the number one negotiation podcast in the world, Negotiate Anything, which currently has over 5 million downloads worldwide. Under his leadership, the American Negotiation Institute has coached and trained several Fortune 500 companies on applying the fundamentals of negotiation to corporate success. He's also the author of the book How to Have Difficult Conversations About Race and the creator of Negotiable, an Online Community to Learn to Negotiate Anything. We often think about questions as a way to discover more — but have you also considered how your questions might influence? Kwame Christian and I discuss three key steps in order to persuade better through your intentional questions. Key Points Rapport questions help you make a connection with the other party and establish a baseline for how they communicate. A helpful place to begin on rapport is noticing something that you genuinely admire or are curious about in the other party. When gaining information, start broadly and then pull the thread when the other party leads you down a path. Beware that your role/positions can cause people to say more than they otherwise might. “What would it take?” is often a helpful way to illuminate a path forward. Even if you ultimately are more directive, laying the foundation through questions allows the other party to be heard and understand. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) How to Ask Better Questions, with David Marquet (episode 454) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic. To accelerate your learning, uncover more inside Coaching for Leaders Plus.

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