Culips Everyday English Podcast show

Culips Everyday English Podcast

Summary: Learning English is tough stuff, but we're here to help every step of the way. This podcast is for English language learners who want to improve their lives by becoming fluent in English. Our high-quality lessons are free, fun and taught by our expert hosts. Listening to Culips is like sitting in on an interesting chat between good friends. Your fluency, listening skills, vocabulary, and pronunciation will improve naturally as you get to know our hosts and learn about interesting topics and trends in Canada and around the world. Get awesome at English, with Culips!

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Podcasts:

 Suzanne’s Quick Tips Episode #1: Slow down | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 5:45

Episode description Hey guys, this is Suzanne. And you’re listening to Culips. Welcome to our new series called Quick Tips for all of your quick and easy English tips. Sometimes we might cover speech, sometimes grammar, sometimes how to give presentations or do interviews in English. Today, we’re going to be talking about a speech feature, slowing down or slowing down our speech rate. Quick tip takeaways * Fast does not mean fluent! * Elongate and stretch out the words you want to stress or emphasize. * Slowing down allows the person with whom you are talking to understand your message, making you more comprehensible. Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com.

 Simplified Speech #080 – The most interesting woman in the world | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 28:28

A few months ago, the Culips team did an episode on the world’s most interesting man. Now is the time for the world’s most interesting woman! Hosts Andrew and Jeremy speak in-depth about the one and only Greta Thunberg. Fun facts To avoid flying, Greta sailed from Europe to North America on a racing yacht over the course of 15 days. The yacht was equipped with solar panels and underwater wind turbines. Is that a journey you would take? Expressions included in the study guide * To crown [someone] * In the not too distant future * To go green * To practice what you preach * A light bulb moment * To sit on the sidelines Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com. Credit: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Step On by Jahzzar

 Jeremy’s English Tips #11: How to talk about pets | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 7:00

Episode description In this episode of Jeremy’s English Tips by Culips, I’ll be talking about pets, but more specifically dogs. However, all of what you will learn in this episode can be applied to almost any pet. Key Points * If the animal has a name, remember it * Ask the owner before petting the animal * Ask about the breed or species of the animal * Dog owners are most likely to be seen in public Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com.

 Chatterbox #245 – Shake up your life | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 16:16

Have you ever felt like your life is a bit boring, like you’re stuck doing the same old routine every day? Then listen to this Chatterbox episode with Andrew and Kassy, where they introduce some useful tips on how to shake up your life and appreciate the world around you. Fun facts According to the Alzheimer’s Association, shaking things up and staying active in your life are some of the best ways to prevent Alzheimer’s or memory loss later in life. Apart from a clean diet and exercising, doctors say that keeping social, challenging your brain, and continuously learning and discovering new things is the best way to keep your mind fresh, even into old age. Expressions included in the study guide * To shake up [something] * In a rut * Out of the blue * Creepy * Stumble upon * To expand one’s horizons Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com. Credit: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Step On by Jahzzar

 Real Talk #038 – How to choose a cell phone plan | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 28:19

Living in a foreign country and need to buy a new phone or sign up for a phone plan? Then click on this episode straight away! In this Real Talk episode, Andrew and Suzanne introduce useful cell phone and cell phone plan–related vocabulary. Fun facts Did you know that cell phones can have up to 18 times more bacteria than toilet handles? So make sure you are disinfecting your phone regularly and, please, don’t use your phone while in the bathroom! Expressions included in the study guide * To win [someone] over * Unlocked * Pay-as-you-go/prepaid * To be tied down * Bundle * Month-to-month * Carrier Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com. Credit: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Step On by Jahzzar

 Jeremy’s English Tips #10: The last straw | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 10:26

Episode description I will be sharing an idiomatic expression with you today. I hope you’re excited. Our expression for today is the last straw, the last straw.  Now, this expression comes from a longer expression, and the longer version is less commonly used, but still, most native English speakers will know this phrase, so I’ll share it with you as well. The phrase is the straw that broke the camel’s back Example sentences * My husband cheating on me was the last straw. I filed for divorce right after I found out. * Getting my car broken into was the last straw. After that, I finally bought a car alarm. *  The terrible sales report was the last straw. When he saw it, the CEO instantly fired the management team. * I’m warning you this is the last straw! If you are late for class one more time, you’re going to get an F!   Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com.

 Simplified Speech #079 – Escape rooms | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 13:11

Escape rooms are a fun, entertaining, and sometimes challenging way to spend an hour or two with friends. Andrew and Kassy talk about the escape rooms they’ve tried and how this fun experience can be different depending on where you are in the world. Fun facts The very first live escape room was created by the Japanese company SCRAP in 2007. The concept is based on escape room–style video games, where players have to solve mysteries in order to escape and move to the next level. As of 2018—just 11 years later— there were over 14,000 escapes rooms worldwide. Expressions included in the study guide * Here and there * To come up with [something] * From [something] to [something] * Lifeline * I’m just going to say it Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com. Credit: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Step On by Jahzzar

 Chatterbox #244 – Meeting celebrities | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 28:40

It seems everybody has a story about meeting a celebrity. Sometimes it is an uncomfortable situation, and sometimes it ends up being a great story. In this Chatterbox episode, hosts Andrew and Suzanne have some interesting stories to share with you about their celebrity encounters. Fun facts Paparazzi are famous for stalking celebrities to take their pictures. Interestingly, the word paparazzi comes from a character named Paparazzo in the movie La Dolce Vita. As you might have guessed, Paparazzo was a pretty intrusive news photographer. Expressions included in the study guide * To get a lot of buzz * Starstruck * To freak out * Under the radar * A-lister * Down to earth Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com. Credit: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Step On by Jahzzar

 Jeremy’s English Tips #9: Making new habits | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 9:53

Episode description In this episode, we are going to be talking about habits, and more specifically, we will be talking about making new habits. In order to learn language more efficiently, we need to make some new study habits and integrate them into our daily lives. In order to do that, I recommend something called habit piggybacking. Now piggyback, to give someone a piggyback ride we say, means you give someone a ride on your back. Habit piggybacking is a great way to form new habits. For example, if you want to make a habit of studying vocabulary flashcards every day, then you should pair your vocabulary study with another thing that you already do every day. For example, before you eat breakfast, you study your flashcards. Take home messages  Making new habits is difficult because following old habits is always easier  You can’t teach an old dog new tricks  Habit piggy-backing is a great way to form new habits  For language learners, making a habit of doing repetitive listening and vocabulary study is a great way to accelerate your learning  It is okay to take breaks sometimes because the brain needs time to synthesize all the new information Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com.

 Simplified Speech #078 – Raising a bilingual child | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 24:08

How many languages are spoken in your household? In this Simplified Speech episode, Andrew and Jeremy talk about raising a child to be bilingual and some useful tips to use when going about it. Whether you already have a child of your own who you hope to raise bilingual or you hope to raise a bilingual child in the future, this episode is a must for you! Fun facts Over half of the world is fluent in at least two languages. Learning a new language is known to have many benefits, such as enhanced creativity, musicality, and focus, along with the added bonus of preventing dementia later in life. So get out there and keep learning! -Anyone interested in browsing the YouTube channel mentioned in this podcast can go to Hyunwoo Sun’s page here. Expressions included in the study guide * To tackle * To talk up a storm * We shall see * [Something] soup * To rub off on [someone] * Chore Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com. Credit: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Step On by Jahzzar

 Chatterbox #243 – Coronavirus | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 19:34

The outbreak of viral diseases is something to be taken seriously. The new coronavirus affecting China, and soon after many other countries, is a cause for concern for everyone. In this Chatterbox episode, hosts Andrew and Jeremy talk about the sensitive topic of this new outbreak and how to discuss it in English. Fun facts It might not seem like much, but one of the best methods of prevention when it comes to infectious diseases is the simple act of washing your hands. Be sure to scrub up frequently throughout the day! Expressions included in the study guide * To prime [someone] * To spring up * An angle * Out of [one’s] mind * To get worked up * Epidemic/pandemic Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com. Credit: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Step On by Jahzzar

 Jeremy’s English Tips #8: English names | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 11:27

Episode description Thank you for checking out this episode of Jeremy’s English Tips. In this episode, we are going to talk about English names. All right, so I should start by saying that most of this is my personal opinion. So, I know that some people might think differently, but all I can do is share my personal opinion with you, so that’s what I’m going to do. Now, my opinion is that English names are helpful when your real name is too difficult for English speakers to pronounce correctly. Take home messages * Jeremy’s opinion is that English names are helpful when your real name is too difficult for English speakers to pronounce correctly. * If you make an English name, you should choose something that sounds similar to your real name. * Middle names are common in English speaking countries, but are not necessary. *  In diverse parts of North America, many people will prefer to call you by your real name out of respect. * Nicknames are names that are usually made for fun, and can be a shortened form of your real name or something completely made up.  Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com.

 Real Talk #037 – How to check in for a flight | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 16:32

Whether you’re on vacation or travelling for business, chances are, you’re going to have to get on a plane in the coming years. In this episode of Real Talk, Andrew and Jeremy go over the phrases and terms used at the airport before you can get on a flight. Fun facts Chicago’s O’Hare airport is the busiest airport in the world. Since 2014, it accepts the most travellers every year, as well as boasting the most takeoffs and landings. Before 2014, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson airport was the busiest. Expressions included in the study guide * Travel light * To check in * Check a bag * Layover * To offset Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com. Credit: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Step On by Jahzzar

 Jeremy’s English Tips #7: Spaced repetition | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 12:26

Episode description Spaced repetition is a way of studying vocabulary words, usually in a foreign language, and it is scientifically proven to help you learn more efficiently. So, in this episode we are going to talk about why spaced repetition is so effective and how it works. Take home messages * Spaced repetition is a scientifically proven way to learn words more efficiently. “Space” means that there is a gap in time between “repetitions” of exposures to a word. Click here. * Forgetting is necessary for remembering. Our brain likes “novelty”. In order to make each exposure to a word novel, we need to forget about it for a little while then be reminded again. “Oh yeah! I remember this word”. Same is true with people. * Studying too many words too quickly can be bad. Often called “cramming.” This causes “indigestion.” The brain needs time to digest the new words and phrases it is exposed to * Exposing yourself to a word less frequently over time helps push that word into your long term memory. * Apps like “Anki” can help you do this, but there are many others. Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com.

 Simplified Speech #077 – Books, reading, and reading habits | File Type: audio/mpeg | Duration: 16:40

Soft cover or hard cover? Fiction or nonfiction? Bookworms Andrew and Morag answer a listener question by talking about the books they enjoy reading, what types of books they like, and their reading habits. Fun facts Though not an official dictionary term, bibliosmia is used by booklovers to refer to that great book smell they all love. Expressions included in the study guide * Beat [someone] to it * Pays the bills * To wind down * To take a leaf out of [someone’s] book * To offset * To hold out (hope) Copyright: Culips.com For more information about this episode, visit culips.com. Credit: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Step On by Jahzzar

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