Higher Education Podcasts

Philosophy For Our Times show

Philosophy For Our TimesJoin Now to Follow

Philosophy for our Times is a free philosophy podcast bringing you the latest talks and debates from the world’s leading thinkers. We host weekly episodes on today’s biggest ideas in news, society, culture, politics, science and arts. Subscribe today to never miss an episode.

By The Institute of Art and Ideas

The College Info Geek Podcast: Study Tips & Advice for Students show

The College Info Geek Podcast: Study Tips & Advice for StudentsJoin Now to Follow

Thomas Frank from College Info Geek dives in to the strategies and tactics that the best students use to be awesome at college. Learn how to study better, hack your habits to learn more in less time and be more productive, build a personal brand that will make you insanely attractive to the companies you actually want to work for, and get tips to pay off your student debt fast and start making money. Whether you know your university like the back or your hand, or you can't even find your classes, this podcast will help you become an awesome student.

By Thomas Frank

RoPeCast show

RoPeCastJoin Now to Follow

Are you an advanced learner of English? These podcasts from Saarland University offer challenging listening opportunities and fascinating topics to do with the English language and culture. Get your new enhanced five-minute episode once every two weeks.

By Dr Roger Charlton & Dr Peter Tischer

Oxford Union Library Audio Tour show

Oxford Union Library Audio TourJoin Now to Follow

An audio tour of the historic Oxford Union Library. Since its foundation, the Union has maintained a library for the use of its members. One of the largest lending libraries in Oxford, it is of particular relevance to students studying Classics, English, History, Law, PPE and Theology. In recent years, the Science section has been expanded. The library has a significant collection of 19th century publications, both books and journals, which would be of special interest to researchers studying that period.

By Oxford University

2013 Carnegie-Uehiro-Oxford Ethics Conference:  Happiness and Well-Being show

2013 Carnegie-Uehiro-Oxford Ethics Conference: Happiness and Well-BeingJoin Now to Follow

Many people and countries are now beginning to evaluate the success of their lives or society not purely in terms of money or gross domestic product. The currency of traditional economics - preference satisfaction - has fallen into question as an ethical value. The global financial crisis is seen by many as a failure of capitalism. Some countries have proposed a Gross Happiness Index to replace GDP as the measure of the productivity of a country. What is of intrinsic value in human lives? How should we measure how good a human being's life is? What is happiness and what constitutes well-being? What can we learn from religion, philosophy, economics and the cognitive sciences about happiness and well-being? Are happiness and well-being relative to culture? What roles do pleasure and happiness play in ethics? Should we aim to maximise happiness and pleasure? How should the views of people with disability be incorporated into an ethics of well-being? Jointly organised by The Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education (Tokyo), The Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs (New York) and Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics (University of Oxford) this conference will seek to understand the nature and value of happiness and well-being in practical ethics.

By Oxford University

Great Writers Inspire show

Great Writers InspireJoin Now to Follow

PLEASE NOTE: The 'Great Writers Inspire' project has its own website which features much more extensive, diverse and updated content. Please visit https://writersinspires.org From Dickens to Shakespeare, from Chaucer to Kipling and from Austen to Blake, this significant collection contains inspirational short talks freely available to the public and the education community worldwide. This series is aimed primarily at first year undergraduates but will be of interest to school students preparing for university and anyone who would like to know more about the world's great writers. The talks were produced as part of the Great Writers Inspire Project which makes a significant body of material freely available on the subject of great works of literature and their authors. Visit https://writersinspire.org/ to see how great writers can inspire you.

By Oxford University

Great Writers Inspire show

Great Writers InspireJoin Now to Follow

PLEASE NOTE: The 'Great Writers Inspire' project has its own website which features much more extensive, diverse and updated content. Please visit https://writersinspires.org From Dickens to Shakespeare, from Chaucer to Kipling and from Austen to Blake, this significant collection contains inspirational short talks freely available to the public and the education community worldwide. This series is aimed primarily at first year undergraduates but will be of interest to school students preparing for university and anyone who would like to know more about the world's great writers. The talks were produced as part of the Great Writers Inspire Project which makes a significant body of material freely available on the subject of great works of literature and their authors. Visit https://writersinspire.org/ to see how great writers can inspire you.

By Oxford University

Global and Imperial History Research Seminar show

Global and Imperial History Research SeminarJoin Now to Follow

The Global and Imperial History Research Seminar is chaired by Professor Judith Brown (Beit Professor of Commonwealth History), Professor John Darwin (Beit Lecturer of Commonwealth History), and Dr Jan-George Deutsch. The seminar meets each Friday afternoon during term, where a visiting, usually, scholar's recent research is presented. Those present then engage with both the historical material and historiographical questions of the work. The following podcasts are presented as a means of continuing those discussions and as a resource to those unable to attend. The Global and Imperial History Research Seminar would like to thank each of their speakers for their cooperation in making these recordings available.

By Oxford University

General Philosophy show

General PhilosophyJoin Now to Follow

A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. Taking a chronological view of the history of philosophy, each lecture is split into 3 or 4 sections which outline a particular philosophical problem and how different philosophers have attempted to resolve the issue. Individuals interested in the 'big' questions about life such as how we perceive the world, who we are in the world and whether we are free to act will find this series informative, comprehensive and accessible.

By Oxford University

Sacrifice and Modern Thought show

Sacrifice and Modern ThoughtJoin Now to Follow

Sacrifice is at the heart of religion. It is not surprising, then, that the 'turn to religion' we have witnessed over the past two decades has led to a renewed interest in sacrifice as well. In light of this, the Centre for Theology and Modern European Thought at the University of Oxford presents five interviews with contributors to the recently-published book Sacrifice and Modern Thought (ed. Zachhuber and Meszaros, 2013). At around 15 minutes in length, each interview provides an insight into how the modern fascination for the topic of sacrifice has evolved, and how the concept of sacrifice in turn has shaped theological debate, the literary imagination and anthropological theory. We hope you enjoy the recordings.

By Oxford University